Nietzsche genealogy of morals second essay summary

In general, what can be achieved through punishment, in human beings and animals, is an increase in fear, a honing of prudence, control over desires. One utility it does not possess, however, is awakening remorse.

On the Genealogy of Morals Summary

They enjoy the advantages Nietzsche genealogy of morals second essay summary a community and what fine advantages they are! At first this realization brings horrible guilt; later man turns against his creditor God, or nature, or even existence [24] ; eventually man finds alleviation in the unique claims of Christianity: With their own purely "modern" experience extending only through five periods, with no knowledge of or any desire to know the past, and even less historical insight, a "second perspective"—something so necessary at this point—they nonetheless pursue the history of morality.

The relationship in civil law between the debtor and the creditor, which I have reviewed extensively already, has been reinterpreted once again in an extremely remarkable and dubious historical manner into a relationship which we modern men are perhaps least capable of understanding, namely, into the relationship between those people presently alive and their ancestors.

Its beginnings, just like the beginnings of everything great on earth, were watered thoroughly and for a long time with blood. The ancients understood debt, and felt a debt that only grew for their ancestors. That was reason enough for these friends of the gods, the philosophers, not to ascribe such a deterministic world to their gods!

It would have failed if an immense amount of freedom had not been driven from the world under the pressure of their hammer blows—or at least driven from sight and, as it were, had become latent.

For Spinoza the world had gone back again into that state of innocence in which it existed before the fabrication of the idea of a bad conscience.

In general, punishment makes people hard and cold. The real explanation of bad conscience is quite different. A terrible heaviness weighed them down. On the other hand, nobles -- and all human beings, one might suppose -- likely measure themselves against others.

Second Essay, Sections Summary Nietzsche opens the second essay by examining the significance of our ability to make promises. Table of Contents Summary On The Genealogy of Morals is made up of three essays, all of which question and critique the value of our moral judgments based on a genealogical method whereby Nietzsche examines the origins and meanings of our different moral concepts.

Commentary In Nietzsche's discussion of the origin of guilt and conscience, we find a sharp contrast with the other kind of "origin" that Foucault sees Nietzsche opposing.

On the Genealogy of Morals Summary

Everywhere where justice is practised, where justice is upheld, we see a power stronger in relation to a weaker power standing beneath it whether with groups or individuals seeking a means to bring an end among the latter to the senseless rage of resentment, partly by dragging the object of resentment out of the hands of revenge, partly by setting in the place of revenge a battle against the enemies of peace and order, partly by coming up with compensation, proposing it, under certain circumstances making it compulsory, sometimes establishing certain equivalents for injuries as a norm, which from now on resentment has to deal with once and for all.

The creditor is compensated for the injury done by the pleasure he derives from the infliction of cruelty on the debtor. In human beings there is so much that is terrible! If we think this crude logic through to its conclusion, then the ancestors of the most powerful tribes must, because of the fantasy of increasing fear, finally have grown into something immense and have been pushed into the darkness of a divine mystery, something beyond the powers of imagination, so the ancestor is necessarily transfigured into a god.

One was hurt, and then paid back that hurt in kind. Why are the great purposes of the overman better than N does not say they are, but he clearly believes they are the trivial purposes of the last man?On the Genealogy of Morals A Polemical Tract by Friedrich Nietzsche [This document, which has been prepared by Ian Johnston of Malaspina University-College, Nanaimo, BC, is in the public domain and may be used by anyone, in whole or in part, without permission and without charge, provided the source is acknowledged.

Nietzsche's Genealogy. Friedrich Nietzsche published On the Genealogy of Morals in This period of Nietzsche's life is considered by many scholars to be his most productive and significant.

Note's on Nietzsche's Genealogy. A warning. There is much disagreement in Nietzsche scholarship. Nietzsche's Genealogy of Morals Here, Nietzsche uses the term "genealogy" in its fundamental sense: an account (logos) of the genesis of a thing.

Second Essay 1.

Humans are unique because they have the ability to plan for the future, and so. Summary On The Genealogy of Morals is made up of three essays, all of which question and critique the value of our moral judgments based on a genealogical method whereby Nietzsche examines the origins and meanings of our different moral concepts.

On the Genealogy of Morals" Translated by Horace B Samuel agronumericus.com On the Genealogy of Morals" Translated by Walter Hausemann Nietzsche, Friedrich.

On the Genealogy of Morals - A Polemical Tract.

Nietzsche’s Genealogy of Morals

(Translated into English by Ian Johnston of. This commentary is part of The Atlas Society's online "CyberSeminar" entitled " Nietzsche and Objectivism." In this post, I briefly note some of the more interesting points that struck my notice in the second and third essays of The Genealogy of Morals.

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Nietzsche genealogy of morals second essay summary
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